Radical Finances

Getting to 15%: How to determine the best investment vehicles

I believe that the optimal target when saving for retirement is to put away 15% of your income. Potentially more, but certainly not less. Here’s why. Getting to the point where you’re ready to put down 15% is hard. You don’t want to do it when you have debt, because you’d be better off putting … Continue reading »

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How to open a savings account with Ally

(Note that I don’t receive any commissions for posts like this. This is just, like, my opinion, man. Nevertheless, please read my disclosure policy.) For the longest time, the standard for an online savings account was a bank called ING Direct. It was free, offered a high interest rate, and allowed you to create multiple sub-accounts … Continue reading »

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Where to put your buckets

[Hi all. I’m at FinCon this week, and while I wanted to write a post about it while I’m here, it’ll have to wait until I get back. In the meantime, the show must go on!] I’ve talked about the importance of “buckets“. These are individual savings accounts that you use for larger or on-going … Continue reading »

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Can you use an HSA to save for retirement?

Last time, I talked about the health savings account (HSA), and how it offers an unprecedented triple-tax advantage: the money you contribute for qualified medical expenses is tax-free, grows tax-free, and can be withdrawn tax-free. It’s like your own little shell company in the Cayman Islands. Now, the important point here is that the HSA must … Continue reading »

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The investment hat trick: The health savings account (HSA)

When I started my new job, one of the items on my list was to sign up for an FSA (flexible spending account). Now I’ve talked about the FSA before. An FSA is great, in that you can put money away pre-tax to be used for healthcare-related expenses, and really frustrating, because you need to … Continue reading »

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This is why I don’t pick stocks

I’ve often said that my one big stock tip is don’t invest in stocks. There’s too much volatility, too much risk, and not enough gain. We often say that if we had only invested in Apple in 1995, or Amazon in 1997, or Google in 2204, then we’d be rich beyond our wildest dreams. Right, … Continue reading »

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If you don’t understand it, don’t invest in it

I took a new job last month, as I mentioned previously. While it is not in the finance industry, it’s in a space such that people often talk about financial transactions, venture capital, and especially about future developments in tech. It’s a heady space, a strange mix of wonkery and Burning Man-esque fervor. And lots … Continue reading »

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The three questions to ask yourself before you gamble (on anything)

(Note from after this post was written: Oy, what terrible timing to write about Las Vegas. My heart breaks for everyone affected by the horrors that transpired there this past week. There may not be any justice or sense in what happened, but let’s at least take a moment to be grateful for everyone special … Continue reading »

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Are you investing or just speculating?

The economics of the household aren’t great. Not only do you need to keep a reasonably good-paying job for at least four decades, but also you need to plan for a period of your life, say the last third of it, where you may not be able to earn a good living and have to live … Continue reading »

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Maybe don’t freeze your credit just yet

Since the Equifax dumpster fire breach, I’m still on the fence about freezing my credit. Perhaps this is surprising. After all, now that my information, along with 143 million others, has likely been taken by who-knows-who for who-knows-what purpose, it might seem like an obvious move to try to restrict what can be done with … Continue reading »

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